5 of the Best Motorhome Routes in the UK

There are many fantastic road trip routes in the UK which any motorhome owner should tackle at least once. We’ve picked out five of our favourites from different corners of the UK that we think offer something for everyone. Whether you’re looking for a slow amble along the coast or an active outdoor adventure, there’s plenty to do right here in the UK.


1. North Coast 500

It’ll come as no surprise to many that this route made this list. This is an iconic route that takes you just over 500 miles around the north coast of Scotland and is a real bucket list trip. It’s a circular route so you can start wherever you like, however, it traditionally starts and ends at Inverness Castle and then winds its way through some of the most spectacular scenery in Scotland. 

You’ll want to set aside a couple of weeks to do the whole thing, perhaps more if you’re looking to set a leisurely pace. 

Highlights

Inverness: Don’t be too keen to get straight out on the open road and miss some of the great things to see in Inverness. It’s packed with history with a castle, a cathedral and the historic Culloden battlefield. Don’t forget to book some time in for a trip to Loch Ness to see if you can spot the elusive monster. 

Caithness: A stop at the most northerly point of the mainland should definitely be on the list. Not only will you get the opportunity for a picture under the famous sign at John O-Groats, you might be lucky enough to see the northern lights. 


2. The Lake District

The Lake District is a fantastic location for a road trip. However, if your motorhome is on the larger side make sure you’re prepared for the twisting country lanes and some of the mountain passes aren’t suitable for larger vehicles. 

Having said that, this fabulous national park still has to make the list. The rolling hills, dramatic peaks and impressive lakes are a paradise for anyone with any sort of passion for the outdoors. 

Highlights

Ullswater: Head north from the busier Lake Windermere and popular town of Ambleside to the shores of Ullswater. This spectacular lake is beaten in size only by Windermere itself and is surrounded by some of the best walking in the whole national park. Make sure to do a route that takes you by the beautiful Aira Force waterfall and have a go at some water sports while you’re there. 

Keswick: This bustling market town is located to the north of Derwentwater with the Skiddaw mountains creating a dramatic backdrop. There are some fantastic walks in this area that enjoy stunning views over Derwentwater and up to the mountains. 


3. Snowdonia

If you can’t choose between a coastal trip and rugged mountain scenery, a trip to Snowdonia might be just the ticket. 

Highlights

Snowdon: Getting to the peak of the highest mountain in England and Wales has to be on the list for a trip to Snowdonia. You can choose between tackling the impressive peak on foot or you can take a train up. 

Anglesey: Once you’ve had your fill of mountain scenery, head down to the coast and cross the Menai suspension bridge to get to Anglesey. Here you’ll find some superb walking routes, beautiful beaches and a whole lot of peace and quiet. Don’t miss Newborough Beach and go for a stroll out to the peninsula of Llanddwyn Island. 


4. The Jurassic Coast

Head down to Dorset to enjoy 95 miles of spectacular coastal scenery. The Jurassic Coast is a UNESCO World Heritage Sites and is famed for the millions of fossils in the cliffs. You’ll find gorgeous scenery, fascinating rock formations and plenty of quaint seaside towns and villages to explore. 

Highlights 

Lulworth Cove and Durdle Door: The iconic natural limestone arch, known as Durdle Door, which reaches out into the sea is the first thing that comes to mind for many when you mention the Jurassic Coast. Formed by the sea after millions of years of erosion, this is one of the most scenic locations in the country. 

Chesil Beach: Another stop on your route has to be Chesil Beach. It’s a stunning shingle barrier beach which stretches 18 miles. For fantastic views of the beach and out to sea, head to the Portland Bill lighthouse or up to Abbotsbury Gardens. 


5. Causeway Coastal Route

Head to the Antrim Coast for miles of breathtaking natural beauty that encompasses pretty seaside towns, vast beaches and the unique Giant’s Causeway that almost has to be seen to be believed.

Highlights

Benone Beach: This huge beach is a great spot to stop for an afternoon or perhaps park up at the camp site and stay for a few days. This is a popular destination for surfers and there are also some great hiking routes in the area.

Giant’s Causeway: One of the most recognisable natural landmarks in the UK, Giant’s Causeway features around 40,000 columns of basalt protruding into the North Atlantic. Believed to be between 50 and 60 million years old, this really is a breathtaking place to visit. There are several hiking routes which offer fantastic views of the causeway, such as the Shepherd’s Steps that will give you an aerial perspective. 





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